It's All About Style – How Do You Manage? – ClearanceJobs

Just like every other job, managers aren’t a one size fits all. Personalities come into play in more ways than one, and how you manage your team affects your relationship with your team members and how effectively your team runs.
Want to find out your management style? Take our quiz!
Firm leader or creative collaborator? Do you lead from the front – or are you someone who gently guides your team to achieve your objectives?
 
Take our quiz to learn more about your managerial approach.
You have a more democratic style of leadership – where you make it a point of soliciting feedback from each member of your team. After all, you know that if every team member feels valued – you’re far more likely to get the best out of them to accomplish your team’s goals.
 
The good news is that this collaborative style of management can be powerful at building a sense of teamwork and buy-in for any big decisions.
 
However, you should take extra steps to ensure that collaboration doesn’t slow your team down. Sometimes as a manager, you need to be decisive – and with deadlines looming, make the quick and occasionally unpopular decision.
 
But as a collaborative manager, your team should be okay with this – they’ll know that their opinions matter, and that you will reach out to them as circumstances allow.
Now at first glance, you might think the word authoritative has a bit of a negative connotation. But we disagree – there’s always a place in teams for calm, firm leadership to keep things on track.
 
Sure, collaboration and cooperation all have their place – but carried too far, teams can be at risk of losing their way. In this increasingly fast-paced world, managers that embrace these traits can prove incapable of making the quick decisions required to succeed.
 
A word of caution however – it can be tempting to adopt a ‘I know best’ attitude, and try and make ALL the decisions. Continuous micromanagement can demotivate high performers, especially in the creative and high tech industries.
 
We recommend a ‘less is more’ approach – where you save your authoritarian moments for the most critical or time-sensitive situations. Your teams will stay flexible, happy, while on track towards their objectives.
 
You’re the type of manager who’s a born coach. Your team members are important to you on a personal level, and you excel at encouraging all of your reports to grow, strive, and improve.
 
Mentoring works best with small teams – as it requires a level of 1:1 attention that can prove difficult to scale up into larger organizations. If you have more than 7-8 direct reports, we recommend you adopt a different style to suit your bigger team.
 
One thing to watch out for – coaching only works where you have noticeably more skills and experience than your team. Certain personality types also can be resistant to the mentoring approach – so you might need to adjust your approach based on who are on your team.
 
 

Firm leader or creative collaborator? Do you lead from the front – or are you someone who gently guides your team to achieve your objectives?
 
Take our quiz to learn more about your managerial approach.
You have a more democratic style of leadership – where you make it a point of soliciting feedback from each member of your team. After all, you know that if every team member feels valued – you’re far more likely to get the best out of them to accomplish your team’s goals.
 
The good news is that this collaborative style of management can be powerful at building a sense of teamwork and buy-in for any big decisions.
 
However, you should take extra steps to ensure that collaboration doesn’t slow your team down. Sometimes as a manager, you need to be decisive – and with deadlines looming, make the quick and occasionally unpopular decision.
 
But as a collaborative manager, your team should be okay with this – they’ll know that their opinions matter, and that you will reach out to them as circumstances allow.
Now at first glance, you might think the word authoritative has a bit of a negative connotation. But we disagree – there’s always a place in teams for calm, firm leadership to keep things on track.
 
Sure, collaboration and cooperation all have their place – but carried too far, teams can be at risk of losing their way. In this increasingly fast-paced world, managers that embrace these traits can prove incapable of making the quick decisions required to succeed.
 
A word of caution however – it can be tempting to adopt a ‘I know best’ attitude, and try and make ALL the decisions. Continuous micromanagement can demotivate high performers, especially in the creative and high tech industries.
 
We recommend a ‘less is more’ approach – where you save your authoritarian moments for the most critical or time-sensitive situations. Your teams will stay flexible, happy, while on track towards their objectives.
 
You’re the type of manager who’s a born coach. Your team members are important to you on a personal level, and you excel at encouraging all of your reports to grow, strive, and improve.
 
Mentoring works best with small teams – as it requires a level of 1:1 attention that can prove difficult to scale up into larger organizations. If you have more than 7-8 direct reports, we recommend you adopt a different style to suit your bigger team.
 
One thing to watch out for – coaching only works where you have noticeably more skills and experience than your team. Certain personality types also can be resistant to the mentoring approach – so you might need to adjust your approach based on who are on your team.
 
 

 
Each of the three management styles has positive qualities but also has shortcomings to be aware of. And while you may lean one way or the other, that doesn’t mean you operate in that space all the time.
Collaborative managers make a point of getting feedback from each team member. This leads team members to feel more valued and even encourages buy-in from team members. These managers create a strong sense of cooperation among their team, which can be a powerful tool in getting things done.
And while this is true, this type of manager may get bogged down by spending too much time getting feedback. This can delay decision-making, as a manager may struggle to make tough decisions that are unpopular with their team members.
Authoritarian managers are decisive, strong leaders who aren’t afraid of making tough calls. Since there’s usually only one person making the decisions, teams led by this type of manager can easily shift gears or pivot based on the cues from their manager.
Where collaborative managers can struggle to make tough calls, authoritarian managers may struggle to get cooperation from their team members. Team members may also feel overlooked if their ideas aren’t heard.
Mentoring managers love coaching up their team members, helping them set personal and professional goals and encouraging them on their journey. This type of manager supports their employees and can help them realize their full potential.
Mentoring can work well on small teams, but when managers try to mentor too many people, this style may fall short. Some personalities don’t mesh well with the mentorship model, too, so mentoring managers need to be aware of how their style impacts others.
None of these styles is superior, and certain situations may call on managers to adopt a style outside of their preference. Getting comfortable operating in each style can help you adapt when you need to, and recognizing your style’s shortcomings can help you avoid them.
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